Julian Robertson and Tiger Fund Featured in Financial World

Financial World


Source: Financial World
Photograph by Shonna Valeska

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, David Carey, Richard Coletti, Tom Bancroft
July 11, 1989
Page 47

No. 80 Julian Robertson
At Least $8 million

Cats. Robertson must love them. He runs the Tiger Fund [in honor of his wife "Tiger" Robertson], the Jaguar Fund and the Puma Fund. Hedge funds all. Even has a telephone in his bathroom in case a trade is a foot. Prefers to hire Southerners as trainees. If they work out, he sends them on to Stanford Business School.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, David Carey, Amy Barrett, Richard J. Coletti and Jackie Gold
July 10, 1990
Page 60

No. 18 Julian Robertson
At least $30 million

Loves cats. His wife is called Tiger, his partnerships called Tiger, Jaguar, and Puma. And a couple of years ago at his annual gala for his limited partners, held at the Museum of Natural History, he even brought out a few live tigers. Last year, Robertson, 57, settled for the serene New York Public Library. Traditionally, each year, he awards the person who was most helpful to him a $50,000 donation in his or her name to a favorite charity. Last year's co-winners: Goldman, Sachs analyst Steve Mandel and Nomura Securities broker Tapsuro Kiyohara, who was very helpful in making contacts in Japan. Retains his Southern accent - he's originally from North Carolina - despite having lived in New York since he got out of the Navy in 1957. Spent some time as chairman of Kidder's investment advisory subsidiary. Robertson is called by one industry acquaintance "the maestro of the investment world" because he's like an orchestra leader pointing his baton at the industry analysts, who he relies on heavily for individual stock ideas. Has suffered a lot of turnover in recent years. Look for him in 1991. He's already up about 24% this year.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub and David Carey with Alison M. Smith
July 21, 1992
Page 40

No. 2 Julian Robertson
Tiger Management
At least $56 Million

Proof that you can take the boy out of the South, but you can't take the South out of the boy, is native North Carolinian Julian Robertson. He retains his Southern drawl even after spending 35 years up North. In that time the 59-year-old Robertson built quite an empire with the veritable cattery of funds. Roughly $2.3 billion is currently prospering in four hedge and offshore funds he runs named Jaguar, Tiger, Puma I and Puma II, as well as private accounts. The feline quartet were up about 56% on average last year before taking their 20% incentive fee into account. A big part of the return came from going long with growth stocks and shorting the Japanese market. Robertson, though, shares the wealth, paying key people very well.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By Stephen Taub, Nanette Byrnes, and David Carey
July 6, 1993
Page 40

No. 4 Julian Robertson, Jr.
Tiger Management
At least $120 million

Like his hedge fund rivals, Soros and Steinhardt, Julian Robertson, Jr., 60, was certainly on the right side of currency trades last fall. Recently, two of his former traders - David Gerstenhaber and M. Barry Bausano - quit after taking personal credit for these deft, profitable transactions. Tiger insiders downplay the duo's role, noting that Robertson must approve all trades.

In any case, Robertson, who now runs more than $3.6 billion in four domestic hedge funds [Tiger, Puma, Puma II and Panther], in addition to the Jaguar offshore fund and other assets in separate accounts, was up about 33.6% last year before his 1% management fee and 20% incentive fees. His personal take includes realized gains his share of the incentive fees.

When he's not busy guiding these billions, the North Carolina native is checking up on the Tiger Foundation, which he launched in late 1989. Its goal: to support nonprofit organizations serving disadvantaged youths and their families in New York City. Funded and overseen by Tiger employees, grants have already been doled out to more than three dozen organizations, ranging from the Children's Aid Society and Women in Need to Big Brothers/Big Sisters of New York City and Prep for Prep - which prepares gifted inner-city students for private school scholarships.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
Call it the year of the hedge funds. For this elite band, it was the best year ever.
By Stephen Taub and David Carey with Andrew Osterland and David Yee
July 5, 1994
Page 33

No. 2 Julian Robertson
Tiger Management
At least $500 million

Few people on the Wall Street 100 have capitalized on the power of compounding quite as deftly as Julian Robertson, one of the hedge fund elite. In the past two years the 61-years old Robertsons assets have more than tripled, to nearly $6 billion. Last year his six domestic and offshore portfolios, plus separate accounts, swelled by around 80% (Gross), depending upon the portfolio. Give the native North Carolinian his usual 1% management fee and 20% performance fee, then figure in realized gains on his own capital, and you come up with at least $500 million for Robertson himself, more than quadruple his earnings the prior year. His secret: big winnings in many European bond markets, which experienced major downward moves in interest rates. He also racked up returns in the high teens on his individual equity portfolio. However, this year hes down around 13% so far.

A fitness buff, Robertson recently ran in the 3.5-mile NYC Corporate Challenge. In fact, for the past two years, he has taken his firms managers, traders and analysts on a retreat to Sun Valley to think and exercise. Last year he led the pack on a mountain climbing expedition even though he was the oldest in the group. Believe it or not, despite his wealth, he still drives an old Lincoln Town Car that has about 120,000 miles on it. Although Robertson talks up the virtues of buying American (except when it comes to investing), his wife recently bought a Lexus. Oh well.

Financial World
The Wall Street 100
By David Carey and Stephen Taub
October 21, 1996
Page 59

No. 6 Julian Robertson
Tiger Management
At least $90 million

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